Ignatiy Vishnevetsky's posts - English uPOST

The director of Attack The Block gets family-friendly with the uneven The Kid Who Would Be King The director of Attack The Block gets family-friendly with the uneven The Kid Who Would Be King

The Kid Who Would Be King, the English writer-director Joe Cornish’s family-friendly take on the King Arthur legend, might be smarter that the average live-action kids’ movie, but it’s hamstrung by a lack of visual imagination and a generic script. It starts promisingly enough. After an animated prologue about the…

Kevin Hart helps Bryan Cranston loosen up in the pandering remake The Upside Kevin Hart helps Bryan Cranston loosen up in the pandering remake The Upside

The Intouchables, Olivier Nakache and Éric Toledano’s monster hit about the friendship between a quadriplegic white millionaire and a black ex-con, was such a formulaic crowd-pleaser that the idea of a Hollywood remake seems redundant. Yet here we are with Neil Burger’s The Upside, an adaptation that moves the story…

Will Ferrell and John C. Reilly hit career lows in the abysmally unfunny Holmes & Watson Will Ferrell and John C. Reilly hit career lows in the abysmally unfunny Holmes & Watson

We’ve been telling jokes about Sherlock Holmes since the beginning. The earliest send-ups of the world’s greatest detective appeared not long after Arthur Conan Doyle started publishing his stories about Holmes and his trusty sidekick, Dr. John Watson, in The Strand Magazine, and by the early decades of the 20th…

Christian Bale’s Dick Cheney impression is the only virtue of the glib, superficial Vice Christian Bale’s Dick Cheney impression is the only virtue of the glib, superficial Vice

Adam McKay’s Vice opens in 1963 in Casper, Wyoming, as the young, puffy, and whoopingly drunk Dick Cheney (Christian Bale) is about to be arrested for driving under the influence for the second time in a year. After losing his scholarship to Yale, he has returned to his hometown to work as a lineman for the local…

Like its hero, Aquaman is big, cheesy, and fun Like its hero, Aquaman is big, cheesy, and fun

Anyone who read comics in the ’90s probably remembers Peter David’s mean, bearded Aquaman, a rejoinder to the Filmation and Hanna-Barbera cartoons that had cemented the character’s popular image as a weenie, the Fred Jones of the seven seas, and the butt of endless jokes about his fish friends and the limited…

With Mowgli, Andy Serkis brings a marginally darker Jungle Book to Netflix With Mowgli, Andy Serkis brings a marginally darker Jungle Book to Netflix

Although it’s more faithful to the characters of The Jungle Book than any of the Disney adaptations, Andy Serkis’ long-delayed Mowgli: Legend Of The Jungle owes as much to bastardized interpretations of Joseph Campbell as it does to the stories of Rudyard Kipling. Mowgli, the wild child raised by wolves in central…

The micro-indie The Great Pretender finds comedy in art, self-deception, and gonorrhea The micro-indie The Great Pretender finds comedy in art, self-deception, and gonorrhea

The retro-psycho Thirst Street brought the prolific Nathan Silver within spitting distance of the indie mainstream (in production values, if not style or subject matter), but he returns to the micro-indie world with his latest black comedy, all the while continuing the earlier effort’s interest in delusion, diffusion,…

Lost for decades, Orson Welles’ The Other Side Of The Wind is a brilliant blast of ’70s Hollywood mania Lost for decades, Orson Welles’ The Other Side Of The Wind is a brilliant blast of ’70s Hollywood mania

“You old guys are trying to get with it. Is that what this movie’s about?” —The Other Side Of The Wind

The incomplete and incomparable Orson Welles The incomplete and incomparable Orson Welles

What can we really say about a life? It’s a question that is asked time and again in the films of Orson Welles, and which critics have often found themselves asking about Welles himself. Among the great American movie directors, his body of work is the most famously incomplete, compromised, and meta. The finished…

Gerard Butler dives into the watchably dumb submarine thriller Hunter Killer Gerard Butler dives into the watchably dumb submarine thriller Hunter Killer

The week before Halloween is horror-movie season. But what could be scarier than the B-list action movies of Gerard Butler, which present us with a world where the lives of millions or even billions have been put in Gerard Butler’s hands? In Hunter Killer, our scowliest movie star plays a submarine captain who is, …

Art and community collide in the fantastic, small-town epic A Bread Factory Art and community collide in the fantastic, small-town epic A Bread Factory

Patrick Wang’s unlikely two-part comic epic A Bread Factory is set in Checkford, New York, a quiet town where residents gossip over coffee at Sam’s diner about the goings on at the school board, the town council, and the Bread Factory, the community arts center that is the soul of the town. Long ago in Checkford’s…

Aubrey Plaza leads a parade of bad taste and noir misfits in An Evening With Beverly Luff Linn Aubrey Plaza leads a parade of bad taste and noir misfits in An Evening With Beverly Luff Linn

To the extent that Jim Hosking’s cartoonishly grotesque characters can be called human, they paint an unflattering portrait of the species. They are dopes and bullies, middle-aged virgins and horndogs with bad hair, disgusting habits, ugly thrift-store clothes. The Greasy Strangler, his debut feature, pitched itself…

More Ignatiy Vishnevetsky's posts »

Language