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Smartphone Notch, Deepfakes, and Facebook's War Room: Best Gizmodo Stories of the Week Smartphone Notch, Deepfakes, and Facebook's War Room: Best Gizmodo Stories of the Week

It’s been a big week for the service journalism here at Gizmodo dot com. We published an exhaustive guide to the 100 websites that shaped the internet as we know it, for better or worse (not you, NASA), regardless of whether this internet thing was all a terrible mistake. We explored how archivists could save history…

We Could Solve the Mysteries of Time and Space—If We Had a Particle Accelerator the Size of the Solar System

Gravity is incredibly weak. Just think: You can lift your foot despite the mass of the entire Earth pulling against it. Why is it so weak? That’s unclear. And it might take a very, very big science experiment to find out.

Hey, Did You Know Stephen Hawking Thought There Is No God? Hey, Did You Know Stephen Hawking Thought There Is No God?

In what would be somewhat of a revelation had the late theoretical physicist and cosmologist Stephen Hawking not been one of the world’s most famous atheists—and spoken or written on the topic on numerous occasions—media outlets are playing up that Hawking’s final book Brief Answers to the Big Questions contains the…

NASA's Flagship X-Ray Telescope Back Online After Last Week's Safe Mode NASA's Flagship X-Ray Telescope Back Online After Last Week's Safe Mode

One of NASA’s flagship telescopes, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, went into safe mode last week following gyroscope problems. That telescope is now back up and running.

String Theorists' Heads Bobble Over Potential Dark Energy Wobble String Theorists' Heads Bobble Over Potential Dark Energy Wobble

Harvard physicist Cumrun Vafa is one of string theory’s strongest proponents. But this summer, other string theorists have been reeling from his latest conjecture, which might invalidate their ideas built on a decade-long assumption that dark energy is constant. Vafa’s work implies that dark energy’s value changes.

Most Commercial Graphene Is Just Expensive Pencil Lead, New Study Finds Most Commercial Graphene Is Just Expensive Pencil Lead, New Study Finds

You might wonder why, given all the hype, there isn’t graphene in every product you own yet. Well, a new study has found that 60 companies that sell the Nobel prize-winning ultra-thin carbon sheets produce utter trash.

Physicist Who Coined the 'God Particle' and Sold His Nobel Prize to Pay Medical Bills Dies at 96 Physicist Who Coined the 'God Particle' and Sold His Nobel Prize to Pay Medical Bills Dies at 96

Leon Lederman, the former head of the Fermi National Accelerator Lab and winner of the the Nobel Prize in physics in 1988, died at a nursing home in Idaho on October 3rd. He was 96.

Male Physicist Claims Women Are Worse at Physics at CERN Gender Bias Talk Male Physicist Claims Women Are Worse at Physics at CERN Gender Bias Talk

This weekend, a prominent Italian physicist, Alessandro Strumia, lectured fledging women scientists at CERN about the dangers of gender equality and “cultural Marxism” within science, argued that women can’t be as good at physics as men, and complained that the actual victims of gender discrimination are male…

Shockwaves From WWII Bombing Raids Reached the Edge of Space, Scientists Report Shockwaves From WWII Bombing Raids Reached the Edge of Space, Scientists Report

As if the devastating effects of bombs dropped on European cities during the Second World War weren’t terrible enough, a surprising new study shows that the shockwaves produced by these bombing raids reached the edge of space, temporarily weakening the Earth’s ionosphere.

Octopuses on Ecstasy, Weight-Loss Scams, and Neutron Stars: Best Gizmodo Stories of the Week Octopuses on Ecstasy, Weight-Loss Scams, and Neutron Stars: Best Gizmodo Stories of the Week

The tech and science world has had a very interesting week: Researchers have discovered what happens when you give our favorite tentacled, ocean-dwelling friends MDMA, landed rovers on asteroids, confirmed the oldest known animal fossil on the planet, and found something very weird going on with a distant neutron star…

The Color-Changing, Hexagonal Vortex on Saturn Just Surprised Scientists Again The Color-Changing, Hexagonal Vortex on Saturn Just Surprised Scientists Again

Sitting atop Saturn’s north pole is one of the Solar System’s most striking weather patterns: a rotating, color-changing hexagon slightly wider than Earth. A new study shows there’s another hexagon directly on top of the first one—and that’s weird.

Feud Week, Dungeons & Dragons, Shooting Bigfoot, and IFA 2018: Best Gizmodo Stories of the Week Feud Week, Dungeons & Dragons, Shooting Bigfoot, and IFA 2018: Best Gizmodo Stories of the Week

Here at Gizmodo, we’ve just wrapped up Feud Week: A series on personality and business clashes in the tech world, scientific disputes, and whether or not to shoot Bigfoot. (I say let the big guy do his thing, unless it turns out it’s kidnapping people with mind-waves to make more Bigfoots.) Some have said that a Nice…

Physicists Just Made the Most Precise Measurement Ever of Gravity's Strength Physicists Just Made the Most Precise Measurement Ever of Gravity's Strength

Gravity might feel strong if you drop a bowling ball on your feet, but is in fact the weakest force. Compare it to electromagnetism: the pull of all the Earth’s gravity can’t stop you from picking up a paperclip with a refrigerator magnet. That weakness makes gravity incredibly difficult to measure.

The Dirtiest Fight in Physics Is About the Universe Itself The Dirtiest Fight in Physics Is About the Universe Itself

A fight over the very nature of the universe has turned ugly on social media and in the popular science press, complete with accusations of “cheating” and ad hominem attacks on Twitter. Most of the universe is hiding, and some scientists disagree over where it has gone.

Sleep Science, DIY Submarines, and Infectious Kissing Bugs: Best Gizmodo Stories of the Week Sleep Science, DIY Submarines, and Infectious Kissing Bugs: Best Gizmodo Stories of the Week

The end of summer is fast approaching, though the fun in the sun is coming to an even swifter conclusion for some of us: Take the tale of Paul Ceglia, the man who allegedly used forged documents naming him as a Facebook co-owner to try and rip off CEO Mark Zuckerberg in court. This week, police reportedly arrested…

'Spooky' Quantum Entanglement Confirmed Using Distant Quasars 'Spooky' Quantum Entanglement Confirmed Using Distant Quasars

If you read enough science news, you’ll know that there’s a long list of experiments attempting to “prove Einstein wrong.” None have yet contradicted his hallmark theory of relativity. But the latest effort to falsify his statements surrounding “spooky action at a distance” has gone truly cosmic.

Scientists Solve Spaghetti Mystery That Irked Richard Feynman

Scientists have spent a lot more time breaking dry spaghetti noodles than you might think. For, if you can control cracked noodles, perhaps you can control the world.

Surprising Accelerator Finding Could Change the Way We Think About Neutron Stars Surprising Accelerator Finding Could Change the Way We Think About Neutron Stars

Neutron stars are having a renaissance, as far as space objects go. These ultra-dense collapsed stars are the source of last year’s most important astrophysical discovery, and they could supply the universe with much of its gold and other heavier elements. But, confusingly, many of their most important properties may…

This Exoplanet Is So Hot, It Apparently Tears Apart Water Molecules This Exoplanet Is So Hot, It Apparently Tears Apart Water Molecules

There’s an exoplanet whose surface is so hot, it rips apart water molecules. It’s almost a star, but not quite; it’s an ultra-hot, Jupiter-like world located around 880 light-years from Earth.

Watch NASA Launch Its Sun-Skimming Parker Solar Probe Watch NASA Launch Its Sun-Skimming Parker Solar Probe

The Parker Solar Probe blasted off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on Sunday, setting itself on course to become both the fastest human craft ever launched (in the neighborhood of 430,000 miles per hour) and the first to probe the outer corona of the sun.

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