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First-Ever Photos of the Elusive Moustached Kingfisher First-Ever Photos of the Elusive Moustached Kingfisher

Feast your eyes on the first photographs ever taken of the male moustached kingfisher, a “ghost species” that has eluded scientists since the 1920’s.

Celebrate National Dog Day with 30 Million Years of Dogs Celebrate National Dog Day with 30 Million Years of Dogs

On a day designated for celebrating canine companions, go behind the scenes at the American Museum of Natural History into the fossil dog collection—the largest of its kind in the world. Find dire wolves, bear-sized dogs, and more. These images and captions come to us from Jack Tseng, a National Science Foundation…

Your Summer Reading List: Science Edition Your Summer Reading List: Science Edition

Heading to the beach this month? So are some of the American Museum of Natural History’s graduate students, who are studying for their Ph.D.s in comparative biology at the Museum’s Richard Gilder Graduate School. As they get ready to head out on their vacations, three students recently shared their favorite science…

A Look at the Extremely Rare—and Extremely Small—Pocket Shark A Look at the Extremely Rare—and Extremely Small—Pocket Shark

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) researchers were trawling in the Gulf of Mexico for a sperm whale feeding study in 2010 when they inadvertently pulled up a tiny, odd-looking shark with a bulbous head and rows of sharp teeth. NOAA researchers subsequently identified the creature as the rare…

Meet the Museum's Language Detectives Meet the Museum's Language Detectives

What does it take to solve a mystery about an ancient Native American language group? 16th-century missionary texts, DNA sequencing methods, and lots of algorithms.

How Natural Selection Works How Natural Selection Works

Natural selection is a mechanism by which populations adapt and evolve. In its essence, it is a simple statement about rates of reproduction and mortality: Those individual organisms who happen to be best suited to an environment survive and reproduce most successfully, producing many similarly well-adapted…

Happy Birthday to Inge Lehmann, Discoverer of Earth's Inner Core Happy Birthday to Inge Lehmann, Discoverer of Earth's Inner Core

In 1929 a large earthquake occurred near New Zealand. Danish seismologist Inge Lehmann “the only Danish seismologist,” as she once referred to herself—studied the shock waves and was puzzled by what she saw. A few P-waves, which should have been deflected by the core, were in fact recorded at seismic stations.

Meet the Women Dubbed "The Harvard Computers" Meet the Women Dubbed "The Harvard Computers"

Before the days of Bill Gates and OS updates, the word "computer" was used (as far back as the 17th century) to describe a person who performs calculations. The latest episode of Shelf Life includes a segment about Henrietta Leavitt—an astronomer and human "computer" whose discoveries allowed researchers to determine…

Ancient Life-Forms Under A Microscope  Ancient Life-Forms Under A Microscope 

March is Women's History Month and we're profiling some of the remarkable women who work at the Museum.

New Study Sheds Light on Mammal Group that Puzzled Darwin New Study Sheds Light on Mammal Group that Puzzled Darwin

Analysis of fossil collagen shows that unusual South American ungulates (like Toxodon platensis, seen here) were more closely related to horses and their allies than to other living placental mammals. Illustration © Peter Schouten

A Fascination with Female Shamans A Fascination with Female Shamans

After witnessing the master of a Korean household receive a tongue-lashing from a female shaman, anthropologist Laurel Kendall realized that "in this corner of Korean society, my gender is going to be an advantage." Dr. Kendall is one of the remarkable women at the Museum we are profiling this March as part of…

Catching Lizards in Pursuit of Parasites Catching Lizards in Pursuit of Parasites

According to microbiologist Susan Perkins, hers is the dream job of a 6-year-old. "A lot of what I get to do is travel to fun and interesting places and chase and catch lizards," says Perkins, whose work focuses on malarial parasites. She is also an associate curator in the Museum's Division of Invertebrate Zoology,…

Women’s History Month
at the Museum Women’s History Month at the Museum

March is Women's History Month, and the Museum is looking to the it's nearly 150-year past, exciting present, and bright future to bring you stories of women in science here at the American Museum of Natural History.

What Color Is This Fish? What Color Is This Fish?

The answer might surprise you.

Crocodiles Rocked Pre-Amazonian Peru Crocodiles Rocked Pre-Amazonian Peru

Thirteen million years ago, as many as seven different species of crocodiles hunted in the swampy waters of what is now northeastern Peru, new research shows. This hyperdiverse assemblage, revealed through more than a decade of work in Amazon bone beds, contains the largest number of crocodile species co-existing in…

Darwin's Kids Doodled All Over His "Origin of Species" Manuscript Darwin's Kids Doodled All Over His "Origin of Species" Manuscript

We may have Charles Darwin's children to thank for the surviving handwritten pages of the naturalist's "On the Origin of Species" manuscript. Most of the original 600 pages are lost, and of the 45 pages that exist today, many were repurposed by Darwin's brood of 10 children as art supplies.

American Mastodons Lived in the North During Brief Warm Interval American Mastodons Lived in the North During Brief Warm Interval

New findings published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by an international team of researchers, including Museum Curator Ross MacPhee, are revising estimates of the age of American mastodon fossils—and helping to resolve a quandary about how these extinct relatives of elephants once…

Open Doors and Pull Out Drawers in Shelf Life, a Collection for Curious Minds. Open Doors and Pull Out Drawers in Shelf Life, a Collection for Curious Minds.

Dive deep inside the Museum's collection to discover the past, present, and future of its approximately 33 million artifacts and specimens in this new series with original monthly videos. Shelf Life is a collection for curious minds—opening doors, pulling out drawers, and taking the lids off some of the…

Scientists Relive Fieldwork in the Museum's Expedition Report Podcast Series Scientists Relive Fieldwork in the Museum's Expedition Report Podcast Series

The American Museum of Natural History has approximately 200 working scientists who undertake more than 100 expeditions a year, doing original research and expanding the Museum's world-class collection of more than 33 million specimens and artifacts. The Expedition Report podcast series offers an insider's look at…

Meet Three People Graduating From The American Museum of Natural History Meet Three People Graduating From The American Museum of Natural History

On October 27, the third cohort of graduates from the Museum's Richard Gilder Graduate School—the first Ph.D.-granting program for any museum in the Western Hemisphere—will receive Doctor of Philosophy degrees in comparative biology at a commencement ceremony in the Milstein Hall of Ocean Life. We're profiling the…

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